UNIFORMED PROFESSIONAL
  • Fire Safety Information
    September 2015: Learn About Fire Escape Plans
    May 15, 2013
    Learn About Fire Escape Plans   In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared. Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly. In less than 30 seconds, a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire.
    September 2015: Mitigation of Cooking Fires
    May 15, 2013

    Mitigation of Cooking Fires

    Fires resulting from cooking continue to be the most common type of fire experienced in U.S. households. This is true for fires reported to fire departments and those handled by private individuals. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire injuries.

    The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) conducts research into the types of behaviors and sequences of events that lead to cooking fires. Through this research, we develop recommendations for behavioral mitigation strategies that will reduce such fires and their resultant injuries and fatalities.

    Facts About Cooking Fires

    • Cooking is the leading cause of residential building fires and residential building fire injuries.
    • Between 2008-2010, cooking accounted for 45 percent of residential building fires responded to by fire departments.
    • Ninety-four percent of residential cooking fires are confined fires that result in little or no loss.
    • Males face a disproportionate risk of cooking fire injury relative to the amount of cooking they do.
    • Young children and older adults face a higher risk of death from cooking fires than do other age groups.
    • Young children are at high risk from non-fire cooking-related burns.
    • Unattended cooking is the leading factor contributing to cooking fires.
    • Many other cooking fires begin because combustibles are too close to cooking heat sources.
    • Frying is the cooking method posing the highest risk.
    • More than half of the home cooking injuries occur when people try to fight the fire themselves.
    • Educational effectiveness may be enhanced by linking burn prevention and fire prevention.
    • Technology may be the best long-term solution to dealing with the cooking fire problem.


    Install & Test Smoke Alarms
    Oct 20, 2006

    Install and Test Smoke Alarms. For additional Safety Tips Please Contact your local Fire Marshal's Office:

    Because fire can grow and spread so quickly, having working smoke alarms in your home can mean the difference between life and death. But these life-saving devices are only effective when they're working properly. Smoke alarms with batteries that are dead, disconnected, or missing can't alert you to the dangers of smoke and fire. Follow these tips to ensure that your smoke alarms are installed correctly and tested regularly.

    Once the alarm sounds, you may have as few as two minutes to escape. By learning how to effectively use the smoke alarm's early warning to get out safely, you'll reduce your risk of dying in a home fire.
    Once the alarm sounds, you may have as few as two minutes to escape. By learning how to effectively use the smoke alarm's early warning to get out safely, you'll reduce your risk of dying in a home fire.
    The right way to install smoke alarms
    • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, making sure that there is an alarm outside every separate sleeping area. New homes are required to have a smoke alarm in every sleeping room and all smoke alarms must be interconnected.
    • Hard-wired smoke alarms operate on your household electrical current. They can be interconnected so that every alarm sounds regardless of the fire's location. This is an advantage in early warning, because it gives occupants extra time to escape if they are in one part of the home and a fire breaks out in another part. Alarms that are hard-wired should have battery backups in case of a power outage, and should be installed by a qualified electrician.
    • If you sleep with bedroom doors closed, have a qualified electrician install interconnected smoke alarms in each room so that when one alarm sounds, they all sound.
    • If you, or someone in your home is deaf or hard of hearing, consider installing an alarm that combines flashing lights, vibration and/or sound.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Ceiling mounted alarms should be installed at least four inches away from the nearest wall; wall-mounted alarms should be installed four to 12 inches away from the ceiling.
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm near the ceiling's highest point.
    • Don't install smoke alarms near windows, doors, or ducts where drafts might interfere with their operation.
    • Never paint smoke alarms. Paint, stickers, or other decorations could keep the alarms from working.
    A life-saving test: check your smoke alarms regularly
    • Test your smoke alarms once a month, following the manufacturer's instructions.
    • Replace the batteries in your smoke alarm once a year, or as soon as the alarm "chirps" warning that the battery is low. Hint: schedule battery replacements for the same day you change your clocks from daylight savings time to standard time in the fall.
    • Never "borrow" a battery from a smoke alarm. Smoke alarms can't warn you of fire if their batteries are missing or have been disconnected.
    • Don't disable smoke alarms even temporarily. If your smoke alarm is sounding "nuisance alarms," try relocating it farther from kitchens or bathrooms, where cooking fumes and steam can cause the alarm to sound.
    • Regularly vacuuming or dusting your smoke alarms, following the manufacturer's instructions, can keep them working properly.
    • Smoke alarms don't last forever. Replace yours once every 10 years. If you can't remember how old the alarm is, then it's probably time for a new one.
    • Consider installing smoke alarms with "long-life" (10-year) batteries.
    • Plan regular fire drills to ensure that everyone knows exactly what to do when the smoke alarm sounds. Hold a drill at night to make sure that sleeping family members awaken at the sound of the alarm. Some studies have shown that some children may not awaken to the sound of the smoke alarm. Know what your child will do before a fire occurs.
    • If you are building a new home or remodeling your existing home, consider installing an automatic home fire sprinkler system. Sprinklers and smoke alarms together cut your risk of dying in a home fire 82 percent relative to having neither – a savings of thousands of lives a year.

    Fire Extinguishers
    Oct 20, 2006
    Fire Extinguishers
     
    A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until the fire department arrives; but portable extinguishers have limitations. Because fire grows and spreads so rapidly, the number one priority for residents is to get out safely.
    Safety tips:
    • Use a portable fire extinguisher when the fire is confined to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing; everyone has exited the building; the fire department has been called or is being called; and the room is not filled with smoke.
    • To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS:
        - Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle
          pointing away from you, and release the locking
          mechanism.
        - Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
        - Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
        - Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.
    • For the home, select a multi-purpose extinguisher (can be used on all types of home fires) that is large enough to put out a small fire, but not so heavy as to be difficult to handle.
    • Choose a fire extinguisher that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory.
    • Read the instructions that come with the fire extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. Local fire departments or fire equipment distributors often offer hands-on fire extinguisher trainings.
    • Install fire extinguishers close to an exit and keep your back to a clear exit when you use the device so you can make an easy escape if the fire cannot be controlled. If the room fills with smoke, leave immediately.
    Know when to go. Fire extinguishers are one element of a fire response plan, but the primary element is safe escape. Every household should have a home fire escape planand working smoke alarms.

    September 2015: Candle with Care
    Oct 20, 2006
    Candles may look nice, but they’re a growing fire threat in our communities.
    Reducing the risk
    • Never leave a burning candle unattended. Extinguish all candles when you leave the room or go to bed. Almost half of all home fires started by candles begin in the bedroom. NFPA discourages the use of candles in the bedroom and other areas where people may fall asleep.
    • Keep candles at least one foot away from anything that can burn including curtains, blinds, wallpaper, clothing or any other material that can catch fire.
    • Don’t place lit candles in windows or near doorways where drafts could bring combustibles in contact with the flame.
    • Keep candles away from flammable liquids.
    “Candle with Care”
    • Use candle holders that are sturdy, won’t tip over easily, are made from a material that can’t burn, and are large enough to collect dripping wax.
    • Place candle holders on a sturdy, uncluttered surface—away from edges and any place where they could be knocked over by kids or pets.
    • Light candles carefully. Keep your hair and any loose clothing away from the flame.
    • Keep candle wicks trimmed to one-quarter inch.
    • Extinguish candles when they burn down to within two inches of their holder or any decorative material.
    • Extinguish candles carefully, using a long-handled candle snuffer or a soft, directed breath. Be careful not to splatter wax when extinguishing. Do not leave the room until wicks have stopped glowing.
    • Avoid using candles during a power outage. Have flashlights and battery-powered lighting on hand for emergency lighting. – link to national fuel fund info.
    Candles and kids
    • Never leave a child unattended in a room with a burning candle.
    • Don’t allow kids or teens to burn candles in their bedrooms.
    • Don’t let kids play with candles or dripping wax – or with materials that could catch fire near candles.
    • Store matches and lighters up high and out of children’s sight and reach, preferably in a locked cabinet.



    Page Last Updated: Sep 01, 2015 (11:35:00)
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